The Utah VHF Society
2 Meter Repeater Pair Utilization
along the Wasatch Front

Purpose of this page:

The frequency coordinator is often asked by an amateur for a 2 meter repeater pair for use along the Wasatch Front, only to be told that none are available.  Understandably, this has led to some disappointment, confusion, and (in some cases) resentment.  To some, it may even appear that the frequencies are simply being hoarded by certain groups or individuals.  While this latter point is debatable - depending upon your point of view - there are some factors that one should be aware of before holding too tightly to such beliefs.

First of all, effectively coordinating repeaters is not trivial.  A few of the factors that need to be considered are:


Is it true that unused two meter repeater pairs are essentially nonexistent along the Wasatch Front?

The short answer is yes.  It should be remembered that the coordination of repeaters is a complicated task and expecting a simple answer that adequately answers the question is unrealistic as we shall see!


How are existing pairs being used?

For 2 meters, the public databases (refer to the online repeater list as well as the Utah Bandplan page) online shows everything that is being used in the 2 meter repeater subbands.  This is not necessarily true of, say, the listings for 222 MHz and 440 MHz bands because links (of which there are none on 2 meters in this area) as well as primary control and auxiliary operations are not listed.

Needless to say, a simple listing of repeaters does not tell the entire story.  For example, it may not be clear that a pair is "unused" because of a repeater in another state or because it is off the air until a mountaintop site may be accessed.  Overlap potential is also not obvious in a simple listing.

To help answer some of these questions, what follows is a list showing all 54 2 meter repeater pair, and how it is being used along the Wasatch Front, plus 5 pairs originally designated for packet repeater use (see below.) This list does not provide extensive details of repeaters in adjacent states or areas outside the Wasatch Front that can affect coordination decisions in Utah.


2 meter channel spacing in Utah

In the late 1970's and early 1980's during the nationwide discussions on channel spacing, both 15 and 20 kHz were considered for use in Utah.  As part of the analysis, actual usage patterns and repeater densities (with relation to population) were considered and it was observed that with most of Utah's population being concentrated along the Wasatch Front, the adoption of a 15 kHz channel spacing just didn't make sense!

The reason for this is that with 15 kHz channel spacing, you do have a degree of interference between adjacent channel pairs so it is necessary to space two repeaters on adjacent frequencies some distance apart - but this just wouldn't work in a state such as Utah where most of the repeaters were within 100 miles or so of each other!  With 20 kHz, adjacent-channel interference on FM is simply not an issue so it was determined that with the wider spacing one could put more repeaters on the air in Utah than what would be possible with 15 kHz.

With the advent of digital voice modes such as D-Star, the Utah VHF Society did extensive testing and determined that one could "safely" space adjacent D-Star channels 12.5 kHz apart with the minimum spacing between a D-Star and conventional "wide" FM channel (+/-5 kHz deviation) being 15 kHz.  With this in mind, several digital audio channels were allocated at the very bottom end of the repeater subband with 12.5 kHz channel spacing utilizing frequencies that had originally been coordinated for possible 1200 baud packet repeater used.


What is the "Wasatch Front?"

It should be pointed out that the definition of "Wasatch Front" is somewhat elastic - it means different things to different people at different times.

In this document it refers to the area encompassed by Great Salt Lake Valley (e.g. Salt Lake, Davis, Weber, and Box Elder counties) from just north of the Idaho border and down south, encompassing all of Utah Valley.  It also is understood to include the Cache, Heber, Park City, Tooele, Cedar and Morgan County valleys.

For more information on usage of UHF frequencies, see the 70cm pair utilization web page.

Note:  In the Utah area, a negative (- 600 KHz) offset is used for frequencies 147.000 MHz and below, while a positive (+ 600 KHz) offset is used for frequencies above 147.000 MHz.

An up-to-date repeater list may be found online here.

Output
Frequency
Comments
Primary coverage are of existing repeater(s)
(Does not include significant overlap in secondary coverage areas.
145.1250 @ D-Star Repeater pair, currently used on Farnsworth Peak as a wide-area coverage repeater, 12.5 kHz channel Salt Lake, Tooele, Utah, Davis, Weber and Box Elder counties.
145.1375 @ D-Star repeater pair, 12.5 kHz channel
145.1500 @ D-Star repeater pair, 12.5 kHz channel
145.1625 @ D-Star repeater pair, 12.5 kHz channel
145.1750 @ D-Star repeater pair, 12.5 kHz channel
145.1875 @ D-Star repeater pair, 12.5 kHz channel  Not available for use on the Wasatch Front owing to proximity of the 145.190 repeater.

145.190 @ Voice repeater on the Oquirrhs range.  Its use of this frequency preceded that of digital voice communications systems.
Salt Lake,Utah, Davis, Weber and Box Elder counties.
145.210 * A number of low-level repeaters operate on this frequency along the Wasatch Front. Morgan, Salt Lake City
145.230 * A low-level repeater near Provo operates on this frequency. Utah County
145.250 * This frequency has a number of "low level" repeaters.  It usability is limited by egress of signals from Cable TV channel 19. Utah County, Ogden, Provo canyon (near Sundance resort.)
145.270 # A wide-area repeater, operated by UVHFS, covering the Wasatch Front "High Valley" areas (e.g. Park City, Heber, etc.) exists on Scott's Hill.  This repeater is also part of the Intermountain Intertie.  Another wide-area repeater is to be installed atop Levan Peak and this will provide coverage of central Utah and the southern portion of the Wasatch Front.  Yet another wide-area "Intertie-Affiliated" repeater exists atop Mt. Harrison in Southern Idaho. Wasatch Front - High Valleys, Central Utah and southern Utah Valley, Southern Idaho and extreme Northern Utah.
145.290 * "Medium-coverage" area repeaters near Manti and Brigham City operate on this frequency. Brigham City, Manti (Sanpete County)
145.310 # A wide-area repeater on Ford Ridge (central Utah) operates on this frequency.  This repeater has very significant overlap along the southern portion of the Wasatch Front.  A medium-coverager repeater also exists on Red Spur that provides Cache-Valley coverage. Price, Cache Valley
145.330 * A wide-area repeater operates on this frequency from Medicine Butte (near Evanston, Wyoming.)  A low-level repeater operates from the BYU campus in Provo. Utah County
145.350 * A medium-coverage repeater, slated to be installed near Parley's Summit, is being tested in Bountiful.  Another repeater (to be installed near Dugway) is also being tested. Summit County
145.370 A wide-area repeater near Payson (on Tower Mountain) operates on this frequency.  This repeater has significant coverage along the southern/central portion of the Wasatch Front. Utah County, Spanish Fork Canyon
145.390 # A wide-area repeater near Vernon operates on this frequency.  This repeater has very significant overlap along the southern/central portion of the Wasatch Front. Southern Tooele County
145.410 * This is a shared, non-protected repeater pair.  Repeaters with overlapping coverage may be coordinated on this frequency on a shared basis.  The use of subaudible tones is required. Various
145.430 # A wide-area repeater covering the northern portion of the Wasatch Front operates from Thiokol. Price, Box Elder County
145.450 # A wide-area repeater covering the Wasatch Front operates from the Oquirrh mountains. Salt Lake, Tooele, Utah, Davis, Weber and Box Elder Counties
145.470 # A wide-area repeater (on Powder Mountain) and a low-level repeater in Utah County operate on this frequency. Morgan County
145.490 # A wide-area repeater exists at Promontory point. Box Elder, Weber and Davis Counties
146.600 This pair is not useable for FM repeater operation owing to the input frequency (146.000) being precisely on the FCC-defined repeater subband boundary. None
146.620 # A wide-area repeater, operated by UARC, covering the Wasatch Front exists on Farnsworth Peak. Salt Lake, Tooele, Utah, Davis, Weber and Box Elder counties.  Limited coverage into Cache and Wasatch counties, as well as into southern Idaho and Eastern Nevada.
146.640 * A medium-coverage repeater operates from the USU Campus and a wide-area repeater operates from Monroe Peak on this frequency, effectively covering the Wasatch Front. Logan, Sanpete county
146.660 # A wide-area repeater near Skyline Drive (close to Ephriam) operates on this frequency.  This repeater has very significant overlap along the southern portion of the Wasatch Front. Sanpete and other Central Utah counties.
146.680 # A wide-area repeater operates on this frequency from Powder Mountain (near Huntsville.)  This repeater has significant overlap over much of the Wasatch Front. Morgan County
146.700 A medium-coverage repeater, operated by Salt Lake County ARES, operates on this frequency from Ensign Peak. Salt Lake and Davis counties
146.720 # A wide-area repeater, operated by BARC, exists on Mt. Logan covering much of the Wasatch Front. Cache County
146.740 * A medium-level repeater operates from the University of Utah campus. Salt Lake County
146.760 # A wide-area repeater, operated by UARC, covering the Wasatch Front exists on Lake Mountain. Primary coverage in Utah, Tooele and Salt Lake counties and limited coverage in Juab, Davis, Weber, and Box Elder counties.
146.780 A wide-area repeater operates on this frequency from Lake Mountain Utah and Salt Lake counties
146.800 # A wide-area repeater in Southern Idaho covering much of the northern Wasatch Front operates on this frequency.  Re-use may be possible by a low-level repeater in Utah county. Southern Idaho, Cache County
146.820 # A wide-area repeater, operated by OARC, covering the Wasatch Front, exists on Mt. Ogden. Box Elder, Davis, and Weber counties and, to some extent, Salt Lake, Tooele and Utah counties
146.840 * A low-level repeater exists on this frequency in Salt Lake county. Salt Lake County
146.860 * Wide-area repeaters operate from Medicine Butte (near Evanston, WY) and near Salina (central Utah) on this frequency, covering significant portions of the Wasatch Front. Southwestern Wyoming, Central Utah
146.880 * A repeater, operated by Salt Lake County ARES operates on this frequency from the benches of the Oquirrh mountains. Salt Lake and Davis counties
146.900 # A medium-wide area repeater, operated by OARC, covering the Wasatch Front, operates from Little Mountain, west(ish) of Ogden. Box Elder, Weber, Davis, and Tooele counties and portions of Salt Lake county.
146.920 * A medium-coverage (covering most of the Wasatch Front) repeater (near Tremonton) has been known to operate on this frequency in the past.  Current status is unknown. Box Elder and Weber counties
146.940 # A wide-area repeater, operated by UVHFS, covering the Wasatch Front exists on Farnsworth Peak. Salt Lake, Tooele, Utah and Davis counties
146.960 # A wide-area repeater covering the Wasatch Front exists on Francis Peak Salt Lake, Davis, Morgan and Weber counties
146.980 # A wide-area repeater in the Utah desert (near Delle) operates on this frequency.  This repeater has very significant overlap along the Wasatch Front. Tooele County
147.000 # This pair is used on Mt. Harrison (southern Idaho) with a negative split.  It covers much of the Wasatch Front. Southern Idaho, into Box Elder and portions of Weber and Davis counties.
147.020 * A wide-area repeater near Bear Lake and a low-level repeater near Payson operate on this frequency. Rich County, Utah County
147.040 # A wide-area repeater, operated by DCARC, covering the Wasatch Front exists on Antelope Island. Salt Lake, Tooele, Davis, Weber, and Box Elder counties
147.060 * A number of low-level repeaters operate on this frequency along the Wasatch Front. Salt Lake county, Morgan county
147.080 # SDARC operates several repeaters on this frequency in East-Central and Southeastern Utah.  They also have a repeater linked into the system at the Point of the Mountain north of Lehi that can reach into parts of Davis, Weber, and Box Elder counties. Carbon, Grand, Garfield, San Juan, Salt Lake and Utah Counties.
147.100 * A wide-area repeater operates from the Salina area and, by special arrangement, a low-level repeater in the Ogden area shares this frequency. Central Utah, Ogden area
147.120 # A wide-area repeater covering the Wasatch Front exists on Farnsworth Peak.  This repeater is also part of the Intermountain Intertie. Salt Lake, Tooele, Davis, Weber, Utah, and Box Elder counties
147.140 A wide-area repeater, covering the Wasatch front, operates on this frequency from Butterfield Peak in the Oquirrh range. Salt Lake, Tooele, Davis, Weber and Utah counties
147.160 A medium-coverage repeater operates on this frequency from Ensign Peak. Salt Lake and Davis counties
147.180 # A wide-area repeater, operated by UVHFS, covering the Wasatch Front exists on Hidden Peak.  This repeater is also part of the Intermountain Intertie. Summit and Salt Lake counties
147.200 * A number of low-level repeaters operate on this frequency along the Wasatch Front.  A wide area coverage repeater is slated to be installed atop Sedgwick Peak (in Idaho) to provide coverage of Cache Valley. Heber valley, Tooele County, Cache Valley
147.220 * A number of low-level repeaters operate on this frequency along the Wasatch Front. Utah County, Mantua area
147.240 * A wide-area repeater operates from Tabby Mountain on this pair and by special arrangement, a low-level repeater also operates from the Logan area. Duchesne county, Logan
147.260 * A wide-area repeater exists at Promontory point.  A number of low-level repeaters also share this frequency along the Wasatch Front. Box Elder, Weber and Davis counties
147.280 # A wide-area repeater, operated by Utah County ARES, covering the Wasatch Front exists on Lake Mountain. Utah and Salt Lake counties
147.300 * Low level repeaters in Tooele and Bountiful share this frequency.  (Special arrangement allows limited re-use of this frequency with minimal geographical spacing.) Tooele County, Davis County
147.320 * A low-level repeater operates on this frequency in Logan.  This frequency may be available for re-use, provided that protection is afforded to the SDARC Bruin Peak repeater. Logan, Price areas
147.340 # A wide-area repeater, operated by Utah County ARES, covering the Wasatch Front exists on Lake Mountain. Utah and Salt Lake counties
147.360 # A wide-area repeater covering much of the Wasatch Front exists on Lewis Peak. Summit County
147.380 #* This frequency is shared by a wide-area repeater atop Lewis Peak, a low-level repeater near Ogden, and another repeater near Delta.  (Note that the Lewis Peak and Ogden repeaters are linked together and carry the same audio, allowing "short space" re-use.  The Delta repeater operates independently.)  Another repeater, linked to the Lewis Peak 147.38, is planned for the Mirror Lake area in the Uintahs. Summit County, Ogden area.  Delta area.
147.400 This pair is not legally useable for FM repeaters owing to the input frequency (148.00) being precisely on an FCC-defined amateur band boundary. None

If you have additional information about the usage of any of the repeater pairs, please contact the frequency coordinator.
Notes: Frequency Re-Use guidelines:

The following are general parameters concerning frequency re-use.  Because each situation is different, these do not apply in every specific case.


The Disposition of the 5 Packet Repeater pairs:

In the mid-late 1980's, 5 repeater pair frequencies (145.110, 145.130, 145.150, 145.170, and 145.190) were set aside for future use by packet repeaters for various areas along the Wasatch Front.  At the time it was envisioned that a comprehensive area-wide packet network would develop and that strategically-placed packet repeaters (operating at 1200 and/or 9600 baud) would be an integral part of this network.

Nearly 20 years after packet first appeared in Utah there has never been a packet-only repeater put on the air on 2 meters along the Wasatch Front.  With the advent of high-speed internet and relatively inexpensive wireless networking, the probability of multiple 1200 baud (or even 9600 baud) repeaters on 2 meters would appear to be very unlikely.

In the peak of packet activity along the Wasatch front (the late 1980's to the mid 1990's) some of these repeater output frequencies were used for simplex operation.  The intended use of the 2 meter simplex frequencies, as is currently known (including simplex frequencies) is as follows:

Simplex frequencies used for packet operation:

With the advent of digital voice systems such as D-Star, it was decided that the frequencies originally intended for 1200 baud packet operation be re-purposed for digital audio systems

Questions, updates, or comments pertaining to this web page may be directed to the frequency coordinator.
Return to the  Utah VHF Society home page.

Updated 20121220